Death on a Dig is now for sale on Kobo, Barnes & Noble

I promised I would report on how the distribution process for my first mystery, Death on a Dig, is doing. It has now been distributed to Kobo and Barnes & Noble. 

A search on Kobo discovers that it has been added to their catalogue.  Click Kobo to see.

There’s a link to Smashwords on the page and when I clicked on that, other books submitted through Smashwords appear. Apparently there are nearly 160,000 of them. Many are in Japanese.

Kobo has its own program that allow writers to publish directly to their web site. The instructions seem quite staightforward. There are five steps.

Step 5 is “Send your eBook out into the world. Sit back and wait for the royalties and reviews to come rolling in.”

I’ll certainly do that.

I expect Barnes & Noble to add Death on a Dig  to their online catalogue shortly, and there are a number of other online stores it will be distributed to this week, I’m sure.

It’s already on Amazon, as I mentioned before. I have been anxious to give the book as wide a distribution as possible, but the truth is, I make the most money if it’s bought through Smashwords, so now I’m faced with publicizing on Twitter and Facebook that it’s available elsewhere, all the time hoping that if anyone buys it, they’ll buy it on Smashwords.

Sales

Now for some information about sales. When I published it, I sent out a couple of blast emails to friends, family and acquaintances announcing this as my first mystery.

I actively discouraged most from buying it – or at least, gave people another option – by suggesting that if they wanted to read it, they should use the Smashwords coupon I included and download it for free. What I did ask for is that they spread the word, especially to people they know who like mysteries.

I have a very firm view – if there is any money to be made from this, it isn’t going to be from people I know. I want money from absolute strangers or I refuse to participate!

Despite my message, three lovely people have actually bought the book. Another 10 or so have downloaded it for free. So I am owed just under $17 in royalties.

I have also tweeted about it and posted announcements to Facebook but although people have visited this web site as a result, I think it’s mostly writers who are interested in what I’m saying at the moment. And I’m happy to share my experience; but I doubt that it’s going to contribute to sales.

My medium-term plan

Frankly, I don’t expect Death on a Dig to sell many more copies. There are too many good-looking, well-reviewed books out there with better provenance.

However, I do think that if I keep writing and communicating with people about my writing, my travelling, the process of thinking up ideas and transmogrifying them (yes, that’s the right word – it is something of a magical process) into publishable books, that eventually I might develop a following. That reminds me of a time I was travelling with my sister through Sweden – and we got a little excessively intoxicated one night, and lost both our purses (though they could’ve been snatched now that I think about it – we were quite drunk afterall). Those bags had all our things in it – including our credit cards. It was quite embarassing to need to call dad and mom and make them cosign for a local snabba lån the morning after such good times and with this kind of terrible hangover.

And I’m enjoying it. That’s important.

Have you had an experience with epublishing you'd like to share? I'd like 
to hear about it. Leave a comment below.
Advertisements
Categories: Distribution, Sales, Self-publishing | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: